Thursday, June 23, 2016

SONG OF THE OCEANIDES by J. G. Zymbalist

SONG OF THE OCEANIDES
by J. G. Zymbalist

Song of the Oceanides is a highly-experimental triple narrative transgenre fantasy that combines elements of historical fiction, YA, myth and fairy tale, science fiction, paranormal romance, and more. For ages 10-110.

EXCERPT
Blue Hill, Maine.
3 August, 1903.

From the moment Emmylou heard the song of the Oceanides, she recognized something godly in the tune. As it resounded all across the desolate shoreline of Blue Hill Bay, she recalled the terrible chorus mysticus ringing all throughout that extinct Martian volcano the day her father went missing down in the magma chamber. Aunt Belphœbe followed along, guiding Maygene through the sands. “Why don’t you go play in that shipwreck over there?” Aunt Belphœbe pointed toward a fishing schooner run aground some fifty yards to the south.

When Maygene raced off, Emmylou refused to follow. By now the chorus of song tormented her so much that an ache had awoken all throughout her clubfoot. Before long she dropped her walking stick and fell to the earth. Closing her eyes, she dug both her hands into the sands and lost herself in memories of the volcano. How could Father be gone? Though he had often alluded to the perils of Martian vulcanology, she never imagined that someone so good and so wise could go missing.

The song of the Oceanides grew a little bit louder and increasingly dissonant.

Opening her eyes, Emmylou listened very closely. The song sounded like the stuff of incantation, witchcraft. And even though she could not comprehend every word, nevertheless she felt certain that the Oceanides meant to cast a spell upon some unfortunate soul.

~SONG OF THE OCEANIDES is free at all retailers!

-Amazon
-iTunes
-B&N

ABOUT J. G.

J.G. Źymbalist began writing Song of the Oceanides as a child when his family summered in Castine, Maine where they rented out Robert Lowell’s house.

The author returned to the piece while working for the Martha’s Vineyard Historical Society, May-September, 2005. He completed the full draft in Ellsworth, Maine later that year.

Find him online:

-website
-Amazon Author Page
-Goodreads

~Follow the rest of the tour

And enter the giveaway.

One randomly chosen winner via rafflecopter will win a $50 Amazon/BN.com gift card.

a Rafflecopter giveaway

34 comments:

  1. Mary, thank you so much for hosting! I do appreciate it, and you've got a really cool site! Remember too everyone, my humble ebook is free. I just want this story to reach as many readers as possible because I feel I have something to say about the human condition . . . and the Martian condition too.

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  2. Great post, I enjoyed reading the excerpt. Thanks for sharing :)

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    1. Thank you Victoria. I do love to share.

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    1. Thank you Rita, and it's my pleasure. It feels so good to be a part of the blogosphere. This is where book lovers congregate, I suppose.

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  4. thanks for sharing the excerpt, looks like a good book.

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  5. What do you want people to take away from reading this book?

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    1. Mai, wow thank you for that question. Really this book is a very long atmospheric meditation on coming of age, bullying, and childhood depression. With all the freaky Martian characters and quirky earthling characters, of course I hope it'll be entertaining, but the book is not simple straightforward genre fiction. There are plenty of literary elements. More than anything, the book argues that life can be so cruel that the best thing for parents to teach their children is to take care and not to let your guard down too much.

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  6. Who are some of your favorite authors; what strikes you about their work?

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    1. Peggy, cool question! Sorry for my delay in getting to you. It's been a hectic day. I have a VERY eclectic taste in writers: Mary Oliver, Ian Fleming, Ovid, Ray Bradbury, Hesiod, Erik Linklater, Goethe and Heine, several others too. I suppose the things that strike me most about their work would be the crispness and/or lucidity of the writing along with their quirky sense of humor. The other thing that they all have in common is the stories are always fun or diverting. There's never too much dreary social realism.

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  7. I'm running late today but still wanting to stop by to thank you for the chance to win

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    1. Thank you, James. I've been running late all day today too, if that makes you feel better.

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  8. GOOD LUCK WITH YOUR BOOK AND THANKS FOR THE GIVEAWAY! SHELLEY S. calicolady60@hotmail.com

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  9. I enjoyed reading the excerpt. This book sounds like such an interesting and intriguing read. Looking forward to checking out this book.

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    1. Thank you so much. Just be warned, my writing can be very atmospheric and emotional. I want to say something about the human condition, and I want this book to be something that a thoughtful person can really take refuge in.

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  10. Good Afternoon! I appreciate all the work you have put into bringing us this giveaway, thank you

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  11. Thank you for taking the time to share this giveaway.

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  12. Congrats on the new book and good luck on the book tour!

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  13. Congrats on the Blog Tour; the novel looks great, and thanks for the chance to win :)

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    1. Thank you, Lisa. Oh, and hey I love Betty Boop! Cool!

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  14. I am helping my brother out a bit while he is camping with his kids and having a fun weekend. Thank you for this giveaway

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    1. Cool! Be all that you can be, and be a happy camper!

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  15. Most books seem to be better than the movie; is there a movie that you think was better than the book?

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  16. Ally, what a cool question. Without even thinking, I know one off the top of my head. "Play it as it Lays" by Joan Didion. I had to read the book when I was getting my MFA in poetry because the school required all of us poetry students to take a craft-of-fiction seminar as an elective. Anyway the book for me was too dreary and depressing--not enough humor or whimsy. But not three weeks ago I found the film adaptation with Tuesday Weld on You Tube and watched it for free on my smart tv, and the movie is magnificent. I don't recommend the book, but I do recommend the movie. It just casts a spell, and the shots of early seventies L.A. are really nostalgic. Apologies to Ms. Didion.

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  17. Sounds like a great read, hope I'll have a chance to read it soon!

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    1. Remember it's free too, and it goes good with summer. Lots of scenes along the Atlantic Ocean--the most historic and haunting ocean of them all.

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  18. I really enjoyed reading the excerpt, thank you!

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